Electrician Chris Stewart lives in Edmonton Alberta where, as a medical cannabis user, he doesn’t have the option to visit a dispensary to access different cannabis strains and needs to rely on the government’s licensed producer system.

Stewart recently found that not all producers are interested in offering information on their product after questions on product received from Aurora left him, and several others, blocked by the licensed producer on Twitter.

“I didn’t really have too much of an issue up until a couple of days ago I realized that Aurora blocked me on Twitter for apparently no reason whatsoever,” Stewart said. “I was just following up on another customer of theirs who was sent about 40 grams that was full of seeds and I was just following up to see what Aurora was going to do about it to make it right. Apparently that was giving them the right to block me on twitter.”

Stewart said the initial tweet from user Jon Renaud, saw him and others blocked with the LP not responding after blocking them all until the others began tweeting the company online.

“We have been working to resolve this complaint since it was brought to our attention,” Aurora staff posted. “We have been doing everything we can to assist you Jon. There is a process.”

Stewart said he’s been a medical cannabis user since April, first using product from Tilray which he said was of fine quality, but too expensive.

“I came across Aurora and what caught my eye was the really low pricing of the strains, but, sometimes you get what you pay for,” he said. “You’ve got to smoke so much of it to even get anything out of it. I’ve gotten product which claims 27 per cent THC but, to be honest it’s got to be way lower than that — it’s really black ash and [causes] coughing.

In the second episode of the Cannabis Life Network Smoke Show, accredited lab results found Aurora product at significantly lower levels of THC and CBD than advertised.

“For them to be opening up another huge expansion and for people to think this is quality, it’s not right.”

Stewart says he’s interested in looking into home growing under Health Canada’s new ACMPR system and, while he’s done using Aurora as a customer, hopes the operation makes some changes.

“[They can] respond to their customers’ complaints in a cooperative manner and just treat their customers with some respect,” he said. “After this I’m done with them forever.”