Is it wrong to be a conservative-libertarian pot-smoker?

Must I “Stop Harper” just because Justin Trudeau said he’ll legalize?

Should I throw out all my other political prejudices for this one issue?

There are four scenarios that could occur Oct. 19.

1) The Liberals win a minority of seats and, with support of the NDP or Greens, are asked by the Governor General to form government.

2) Harper gets a minority, but with little support from the opposition, his government is soon toppled and the Governor General asks Trudeau or Mulcair to form government.

3) Harper gets a minority, but then immediately resigns as leader and delays the resumption of Parliament until a new leader is chosen.
This scenario is theoretically possible as Parliament won’t sit until June 2016, but it is customary to hold a Parliament sitting right after the election. Still, Harper technically doesn’t have to do this.

4) Harper wins a minority and is defeated on the throne speech (another incentive not to hold Parliament right away) but rather than concede defeat, he asks the Governor General to dissolve Parliament and call another election.

Governor General David Johnson could say no, and allow Trudeau or Mulcair to form government. But in such an uncertain environment, with spin coming from of all the major political parties after the longest election campaign in this country’s history – the alarm of a constitutional crisis may be too much to bear.

Let’s say the Conservatives win but Harper steps aside, I know just the man to take his place.

Scott Reid, the youthful-looking, 51-year old Conservative MP for Lanark – Frontenac – Kingston.

He’s the political answer to Justin Trudeau.

He’s got the thumbs up from NORML and Sensible BC.

Scott describes himself as more libertarian than conservative. He regards cannabis and drug policy as a provincial issue in which the federal government should take a hands-off approach.

He voted against Chrétien’s Anti-Terrorism Act back in 2001, long before C-51 reared its ugly head.

Scott’s a founding member of a pro-private property rights association that became the Ontario Landowners Association.

He donates $20,000 of his salary to charity because he says, “If a single guy living in a small town can’t get by on $109,000, he’s not trying too hard.”

Scott doesn’t smoke, but his philosophy towards beer mirrors my philosophy toward cannabis – supporting, “Small-scale, artisanal, value-added production that is … closely associated with the land, agriculture, recapturing the traditional way of doing things.”

Prime Minister Scott Reid, now that has a ring to it.

Stick to your guns (figuratively and literally) and recognize that the United Nations will likely start promoting cannabis legalization, eventually softening the image for conservative voters who always end up compromising with the left anyway.

Remember folks, this isn’t a democracy, it’s a constitutional monarchy with democratic principles built into it. You’re not picking a president, you’re electing Members of Parliament.