Medicine Hat police arrested two Manitoba men and seized nearly $300,000 in cannabis products Sept. 24 on the Trans-Canada Highway.

The majority of the seizer was made up of an estimated 8,000 “Randy Candy” THC-infused edibles, packaged in zip-lock bags for resale.

Police believed the products were targeted at children.

“It’s been around for years but we are just seeing more and more of it in Alberta,” said Medicine Hat Police Service Staff Sgt. Jason Graham. “This is obviously of concern to us because it mimics real candy and it’s targeting youth.”

Police said a “significant concern with this form of a cannabis derivative is that it may be consumed by individuals who are not aware it is a drug and also that the consistency and potency of THC in each candy is unknown.”

“This could potential get in a little one’s hands if it is not cared for or watched,” he said.

Police also took possession of  170 cannabis plants. Graham said the seizure is one of the largest in Alberta.

Cannabis derivatives may be legally consumed by patients with a medical prescription.

unanimous decision from the Supreme Court of Canada in June gave medical cannabis users the right to both possess and consume cannabis derivatives, including edibles.

The B.C. Civil Liberties Association had argued against increased control of cannabis derivatives, as it would create a system where patients would be expected to produce the product themselves.

“It’s one thing to say, ‘We as government aren’t really sure what kind of formulations are the safest.’ It is incredibly problematic to say to a patient: ‘Here, go mix this up in your kitchen, like some kind of alchemist,’” said policy director Micheal Vonn.

 A 35-year-old and 42-year-old, both residents of St Laurent, Manitoba, are in custody facing drug trafficking charges.