There’s a class in Windsor that will teach you to grow cannabis. 

The lounge offering it already gives patents a place to consume their medicine.

Leo Lucier, the owner of the lounge, hopes the federal government will legislate legalization in his favour.

Since cannabis use for medicinal purposes is a constitutional right, upheld by the courts, Lucier, like so many others, is keeping a watchful eye for the new regulations the Liberals must announce by Aug. 24.

And, of course, instead of merely enforcing the law, the police are sticking their nose into the debate with their opinions.

Windsor police constable Andrew Drouillard is adamant about the “dangers” of growing cannabis.

“The reason why it is dangerous to grow these things is because mold and other health hazards that can occur,” he said, adding, “That puts the people who are producing it in danger and the neighbouring houses in danger as well.”

Never mind that the Allard case already debunked this nonsense.

There is no threat of mold, because patients don’t want mold on their cannabis. That’s like saying there’s a threat to the general public because some people grow tomatoes for their personal use and there might be mold on them.

If there is a ”public” issue, it’s that we’re all forced to look after each other’s health because of the destructive health-care system. It’s got nothing to do with growing cannabis.

Cannabis is the proximate cause, the state is the ultimate.

Leo Lucier is teaching the four-month cannabis growing course to 40 students, and he’s running it all by his lawyers.

The law is consistent with upholding the rights of cannabis patients. The police are persistent with trampling on these rights based on a drug-war mentality sprung from legislation passed over 93 years ago prohibiting cannabis.

But as seen in the Surrey “terrorist” case, the police break the criminal code in order to “uphold” it.

And, as witnessed in your everyday traffic stop, the police will break the law (going over the speed limit) in order to justify enforcing it (they speed up to catch you speeding).

Criminalizing someone for a plant is downright tyrannical and has no place in a society that calls itself free.

Cannabis will, one day, be as common as alcohol and it’s nonsensical to go against this tide, especially when its use harms no one, not even the user.

This is why the alcohol industry has been funding anti-legalization efforts. 

They know that people will likely abandon the brain-cell killing poison en masse to join the ranks of peaceful, healthy, “potheads.”

No one can stop this. Not the police, not propagandists, not even hefty regulation from the federal Liberals.

The courts may vindicate cannabis, but it’s the people as consumers who ultimately decide the plant’s fate.

And so far, we are winning the battle.