Vancouver-based company Numinus received federal approval for a study on MDMA. Sponsored by the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), the therapy study will involve twenty people with post-traumatic stress disorder. The goal is to learn more about MDMA-assisted therapy, specifically as a treatment for PTSD and eating disorders. In addition, researchers are hoping to gain a better knowledge of how MDMA therapy could fit into society. Here are the details of this new development.

MDMA Therapy

According to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, MDMA is currently classified as illegal to use unless authorized for medical or scientific purposes. However, there has been a growing movement to reform drug laws, especially when a drug has potential therapeutic value.

Numinus study MDMA

Studies conducted by the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) show that MDMA can be an effective treatment for PTSD; “At the primary study endpoint (18 weeks after baseline), 28 of 42 (67%) of the participants in the MDMA group no longer met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD, compared with 12 of 37 (32%) of those in the placebo group after three sessions.” 

Numinus MDMA Study

On Monday, July 12, 2021, Health Canada confirmed the approval for the Numinum study. Trials will take place in Vancouver, BC, with 20 participants recruited this summer. Volunteers will undergo a preparation and drug study session, both lasting full days, before taking any drugs. Rather than being set in a traditional clinical environment, the session rooms are designed to induce calm. Surrounded by plants and greenery, MDMA therapy sessions will be supervised by two therapists.

For more information on the therapeutic use of psychedelics, visit the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies.

MDMA therapy

MAPS is seeking volunteers for this research study

To participate, you must be of legal age and have a current diagnosis of PTSD. If you are interested, click here to apply.

Footnote(s)

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-021-01336-3
https://maps.org/research/mdma/ptsd/phase3